Looking to further sell his plans for health care reform, President Obama visited five separate morning news shows on Sept. 20 whilst never leaving the comfort of the White House Ethan Allen Document Burning Room.

Looking to further sell his plans for health care reform, President Obama visited five separate morning news shows on Sept. 20 whilst never leaving the comfort of the White House Ethan Allen Document Burning Room.

Now usually when you see the same celebrity on multiple shows, they either have a new movie coming out or they deeply, deeply regret the incident in question. But with Obama, it was a health-care junket where he went through the motions with ABC's George Stephanopoulos, CNN's John King, CBS's Bob Schieffer, NBC's David Gregory and Univision's Jorge Ramos.

You know what's interesting? The press bitterly complained about a lack of access to President Bush. Now this president is making himself available to the most influential television journalists in the country. I wonder how that will play amongst other influential television journalists?

"Does the White House run the risk of Obama overload?" asked CNN's Betty Nguyen.

"You could say maybe he's overexposed," said MSNBC analyst Eugene Gibson.

First of all, being on five Sunday-morning news shows doesn't risk overexposure. The overwhelming majority of Americans at that time are either in church or sleeping off something they should be in church for. I think those five shows have a combined viewership of 10 million, with an average viewer age of around 10 million. So if Obama is overexposed, Ryan Seacrest and Tom Bergeron are translucent.

Secondly, the president is not an action figure. We live in a democracy, not a Star Wars convention. When you take the president out of its package and play with it, it doesn't lose value.

There's even an inside-the-Beltway name for the technique of all-out media exposure - the Full Ginsburg. It refers to Monica Lewinsky's lawyer, William H. Ginsburg, who in 1998 became the first person to appear on all Sunday-morning talk shows in one day. And that was 11 years ago.

Of course, former great communicator Ronald Reagan's speech writer, Peggy Noonan, believes the Full Ginsburg to be beneath the presidency.

"The media environment allows a modern leader to be something subtly damaging, and that is boorish," said Noonan. "They get their face in your face every day, all the time. It's boorish."

Only a cad, or rapscallion, would flout protocol with such churless impunity. Perhaps I'll only leave you with this - Ronald Reagan never Twittered.

By the way, the president doesn't just ruin his reputation with the public by exposing himself to journalists - apparently there's another danger. Ruining his reputation with the media.

"We can be kind of a fickle bunch here," said CNN's T.J. Holmes. "Does he run a risk, quite frankly, of upsetting some of the media?"

I mean, we are thin-skinned and superficial jackasses. Coming up next, should Obama be in better shape than us? I mean, isn't that arrogant?

If that's how the journalists feel when Obama sits down with them, I guess they're happy when he decides not to sit down with them.

Apparently not. Fox News was perturbed when the White House issued a statement detailing the decision to exclude Fox from the Sunday blitz.

"They are the biggest bunch of crybabies I have dealt with in my 30 years in Washington," said Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace.

And I work at Fox News with Glenn Beck, a grown man who can't stop crying.