When she dreamed up a collection of earthy, graphical designs that reflect the female experience, Jillian Corron couldn't picture them printed on anything but a T-shirt, the clothing equalizer.

When she dreamed up a collection of earthy, graphical designs that reflect the female experience, Jillian Corron couldn't picture them printed on anything but a T-shirt, the clothing equalizer.

"If you just like graphic tees for graphic tees' sake, [Delicious Tees are] perfect for you," she said. "If you like tees with a message, they're perfect for you."

Through the descriptions of each of her 10 designs - with images and messages that are borderline bohemian - Corron tells a story of growth, acceptance and unity.

She launched the line in 2007 and manages it in her off-work hours. She sells about 10 to 12 shirts a month through ShopDeliciousTees.com and has sent them to places as varied as California, New York and South Dakota.

After shirts are printed to her specifications in Grandview, she ships orders in an envelope she runs through her Deskjet printer and marks with a heart on the back.

"I'm the one who folds it, puts it in the bag, puts the hangtag in there, mails it," Corron said. "It's a very intimate process."

So far, customers have learned about her line through word of mouth, festivals like ComFest and Craftin' Outlaws, and occasional shout-outs on indie websites.

Corron is being both careful and hopeful about growth, collecting fabric and image inspirations in a sketchbook and drawing up images of coordinating hoodies and scarves for a future line.

"The trend right now seems to go more in a very obvious route - block font, real big," she said. "And that's great. I love those T-shirts too. But I also love something that supports a lifestyle and supports a larger message."

Corron, a graphic designer by trade, has been getting more apparel experience through a day job designing with Atrium Buying Corporation in Johnstown, which works on clothing in conjunction with labels like Limited Brands and American Eagle. Rather than burning her out, she says, her two jobs play off each other.

"Everything I do from when I wake up in the morning until when I go to bed is focused around T-shirts," she said. "I love it. I cannot get enough of it."