In Lorna's Silence, Belgian filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (The Son) return to the fringe characters and moral quandaries that have long endeared them to international cineastes and festival juries.

In Lorna's Silence, Belgian filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (The Son) return to the fringe characters and moral quandaries that have long endeared them to international cineastes and festival juries.

Lorna (Arta Dobroshi) is a young Albanian woman with a plan: Get her Belgian citizenship by marrying native junkie Claudy (Dardennes regular Jeremie Renier), then cash in by transferring her legal status through marriage to a Russian mobster and open a snack bar with her boyfriend.

When we meet Lorna, she's already wed Claudy and she's developing cold feet over the deal she made with the cab driver facilitating the arrangement (Fabrizio Rongione), which calls for Claudy to OD by suggestion or force.

Fans of the Dardennes will find in Lorna's story the same strengths of character and spiritual depth that define their earlier films, but the end of her arc seems unusually forced for them. Placed beside their last feature, The Child, this is something of a regression.