The National Toy Hall of Fame in Rochester, New York, recently inducted its latest class in their 11th-annual ceremony. The Hall celebrates our most beloved toys, like the Easy-Bake Oven.

The National Toy Hall of Fame in Rochester, New York, recently inducted its latest class in their 11th-annual ceremony. The Hall celebrates our most beloved toys, like the Easy-Bake Oven.

This year, the inductees were the Big Wheel, a worthy honoree, and the Game Boy, which has done so much to advance both the image of cartoonish Italian-Americans and the art of children not talking to their parents at dinner.

But it was the third nominee that raised eyebrows: the ball.

Ball?! Ball is just now getting into the Toy Hall of Fame in its 11th ceremony? This can't be right.

The press release says, "The ball officially joins the stick ..." Are you kidding me? Stick got in before ball?

Let me explain something: Stick is nothing without ball. What was stick up against, rock and cardboard box? Nope, actually cardboard box was inducted in 2005.

Hey, Hall of Fame! Ten years to induct ball? Get your head out of your ass.

This is why people don't take the National Toy Hall of Fame seriously. It's like having a Heat Source Hall of Fame and putting "fire" in 10 years after "rubbing your hands together."

Ball is the universal toy. If you want to play, all you need is a noun followed by the word "ball" and you have a game - base ... ball, foot ... ball, stick ... ball, eight ... ball, beer ... ball.

If I find out next year you put in bubble wrap before Rubik's Cube, I'm grabbing Geoffrey Giraffe, FAO Schwarz and three of Santa's roughest elves and we're coming up there to beat your balls with a stick.

No thanks

This time of year, we're reminded by our grandparents and Best Buy commercials to stop and remember the things we have to be grateful for. But I know how scarce your gratitude is, so I'd like to ease the load. Here are some things you don't have to be grateful for this holiday season.

Let's start in Detroit, which has been decimated by the recent economic collapse. But there may be good news - Detroit recently sold the legendary Silverdome stadium. The stadium cost $57 million to build in 1975, which is about $230 million in today's dollars. I wonder how much they got for it?

"An unidentified Canadian buyer paid, get this, $583,000 ... at auction for the 80,000-seat Silverdome," reported Fox Business News.

Well, that sucks. An 80,000 domed arena sold for less than a one-bedroom apartment in Manhattan. No, an alcove studio. No, it's more like a non-doorman, walk-up, kitchenette, post-war with a rodent problem that's above a bowling alley and below another bowling alley.

On the flip side of our growing economic chasm, corporate giant Goldman Sachs is one of the few companies that figured out how to profit from the aforementioned real estate collapse. The company is now reporting profits of $35 million a day from over the summer.

Well, that's great, but don't worry - they know you're still mad at them.

"Goldman Sachs is apologizing. Its chairman says the firm participated in 'things that were clearly wrong,' " reported ABC's Charles Gibson. "Goldman will invest $500 million to help small businesses."

Aww, that's so nice. But actually, all the money is going to one small business, called Gold Mansacks. Apparently they make sacks that a man would use to hold his gold. Gee, I wonder who would need something like that?