When they moved from Columbus to Chicago two years ago, Loyal Divide was a promising indie rock act cribbing from the likes of Arcade Fire and Wolf Parade but just as readily cranking out falsetto-laden futuristic soul. They were spiraling in all sorts of directions, a talented crew still grasping for their signature sound.

Lots of musicians move out of Columbus and continue to pursue their craft, from Tim Easton to RJD2 to Adulture's Garrett Shrigley. But most of them also come back frequently to play for the hometown crowd. Two of the city's most promising exports return this week - one from Chicago, the other from Brooklyn.

When they moved from Columbus to Chicago two years ago, Loyal Divide was a promising indie rock act cribbing from the likes of Arcade Fire and Wolf Parade but just as readily cranking out falsetto-laden futuristic soul. They were spiraling in all sorts of directions, a talented crew still grasping for their signature sound.

Boy, did they ever find it. Few would have guessed Loyal Divide would end up sounding like they do on last year's incredible Labrador EP.

The four-song set is filled with hushed moonlight electro jams reminiscent of Junior Boys and heaving electronic skronks from the same phylum as Animal Collective. They've built something astonishingly mature and unique, juxtaposing smooth soul whispers and slap bass with skittering programmed drums, stuttering synths and searing noise bursts like a cyborg's scream.

It's all orchestrated with an expert grasp on dynamics, taking ingredients that could have been a mess and molding them into carefully controlled master strokes - calm, cool and collected, but with a lingering sense of dread closing in fast.

On stage they remain rockers of a sort, if footage from a recent Halloween show opening for Chromeo and Crystal Castles is to be trusted. Here's hoping they stick with the costumes and video that made that show such a spectacle.