A Muse Gallery is one of those places that you'd be unlikely to stumble into accidentally. Although it's housed in a lovely building, it stands alone among more industrial structures on the road between Harrison West and Grandview.

A Muse Gallery is one of those places that you'd be unlikely to stumble into accidentally. Although it's housed in a lovely building, it stands alone among more industrial structures on the road between Harrison West and Grandview.

Like a handful of other local, successful commercial galleries, it's a destination, not a place that you find yourself accidentally browsing after lunch next door.

But that hasn't stemmed its ability to do business. A Muse represents a roster of about 50 established, or "mid-career," artists, and caters to experienced and eager new collectors that are looking for help and advice. It has been open for 11 years, with a second location in Taos, Nesw Mexico, that opened in 2008.

December's group show features current work by about 20 of the artists that A Muse represents. While they come from all over the world, many of the pieces in the exhibit share an ethereal or dreamlike quality.

The gallery is just coming off of a sellout solo show by Sol Halabi last month, and there are several new pieces up in the current exhibit by the 32-year-old painter from Cordoba, Argentina. Her canvases often feature a woman's face painted in rich, realistic detail, surrounded by lush, surreal and abstract settings with turquoise trees, fuchsia skies and orange waters.

Best known for his sculptures of curvy women carved in wood, Ohio University professor emeritus David Hostetler's work has been collected by museums across the country, including the Columbus Museum of Art. He imports wood from all over the world, but also uses felled trees from his Athens farm.

Now in his early eighties, he is likely the most sought-after artist that A Muse represents. His piece called "The Duo" stands in a pocket park nestled against the Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York City, commissioned in honor of Ohio real estate developer, philanthropist and art collector Dan Galbreath (Donald Trump's partner in the development of the tower).

This year brought a film called The Last Dance, directed by Casey Hayward, which looks back at Hostetler's life and the underpinning motivations that have kept him an active art maker for more than 50 years. There are a handful of his pieces in wood and bronze on view, including the lovely "Asherah Tree Goddess" - a female form that stands atop a tree trunk, delicate roots exposed.

A couple of artists that are new to the gallery's roster are also on exhibit, including contemporary painter Mario Madiai. He's a fresh addition to A Muse, but no stranger to the collectors' world. Well-known in Italy, Madiai's paintings feature layers of color punctuated by rose blossoms that seem to hang in the mist.

Selene Plum, who does translucent, abstract landscapes in encaustic, is also new. A former gallery director and curator, as well as longtime TV set designer and prop stylist for national ad campaigns, her work is a meditative exploration of her environment.

Her pieces, several of which are named simply by the date she completed them, are part of a series she calls White Silence Mudra. Most of her work is done at her farmhouse in Green County, Wisconsin, but she also has a studio in Chicago.