In Young Victoria, Emily Blunt joins a long list of ingenues to tackle the role of a young queen. Blunt is definitely the best part of this movie, and even if she's not quite Cate Blanchett-level, she's way better than Kirsten Dunst.

In Young Victoria, Emily Blunt joins a long list of ingenues to tackle the role of a young queen. Blunt is definitely the best part of this movie, and even if she's not quite Cate Blanchett-level, she's way better than Kirsten Dunst.

In the story of a 17-year-old Victoria's accession to the throne in the midst of an attempted power grab by her mother's lover, Blunt plays the young royal as an intelligent and headstrong teen whose heart is in the right place even if she may, as her foes insist, be too young to be queen.

But the film is actually a love story, tracing the slow-blooming romance between Victoria and her cousin, Prince Albert, after their uncle's initial attempts to marry them off are unsuccessful.

If you know the slightest bit about British history or the London museum scene, then you know how this story ends. But the fun is in watching a bashful Prince Albert win over a reluctant Victoria and, eventually, pull off the feat of getting her to propose to him.

It's beautiful to watch, with Blunt looking suitably glowing in her stunning gowns, plus meticulous depictions of royal gardens and Buckingham Palace (Queen Victoria was the first royal to live there). But under Canadian filmmaker Jean-Marc Vallee's direction, the story is just too slight to rank it among the best of the royalty flicks.