Founded in 2006 by a group of college art and theater friends who decided that Columbus looked like a good place to call home, Wild Goose Creative has continued to carve out its own niche and deepen its local roots.

Founded in 2006 by a group of college art and theater friends who decided that Columbus looked like a good place to call home, Wild Goose Creative has continued to carve out its own niche and deepen its local roots.

In the past year, the collective has expanded from a couple of events a month to a calendar of private and public happenings that keep its doors open on a nearly nightly basis. It also stumbled upon the opportunity to open studio space just across the street, quickly filled by a small film company, graphic design studios and other artists.

"From the beginning, artists' studios were something we wanted to do," says Ryan Hoke, one of Wild Goose Creative's founding members.

"The idea behind them was that we wanted to bring together people over art, find ways to have people create and collaborate with each other. The goal - or our hope - is that having people under the same roof will breed creativity and collaboration."

Because the studios they offered were filled only three weeks after they were announced, organizers are exploring options for even more work spaces this year.

"It just shows you how many artists are out there that, one, want to be in a creative environment and two, need the space," says Hoke.

It's been good for Wild Goose in other ways as well. The group hosted some extremely popular events in 2009, like "Bacon Camp" - an entire day devoted to the love of bacon, including tastings, bacon art and a poetry slam. It was so popular, it's spawned the upcoming "Beer Camp," a March event that will feature workshops, beer-inspired art and homebrew.

A new "Speakeasy" storytelling series on the first Thursday of every month will run through 2010, and a comedy festival is planned for the spring. The idea there is to simply give a public platform to people who know how to spin a good yarn, but usually do it around the dinner table or at happy hour, not necessarily in front of an audience.

"So much of what we do is just responding to people wanting to collaborate with us - we have a conversation and from that conversation comes an idea, from that idea comes action or an event," says Hoke.

"Creating a community of people is sort of a nebulous thing sometimes, but I feel like we're having some success."

New Year's Festival

Wild Goose Creative's New Year's Festival, 2010: The Future is Now, launches on Dec. 31 with a sci-fi, art and dance party, doubling as a CD release for John Reuben's Sex, Drugs and Self-Control. Reuben will perform along with Mattiburns and DJ Jessi Cale. Art installations by Fuse Factory, Michael Neno, Christian Nelson, Linzi Rigsby, Maxe Smith and others will be on display, plus there'll be a "space pod photo booth."

The New Year's Eve party costs $15. The festival costs $50 for all events and meals, or $5 for each individual event. Other highlights:

Friday, Jan. 1

Cereal Serial, 11 a.m.

An old-time radio-show-style performance over breakfast by Whistling in the Dark Theatre.

Short Film Revue, 1 p.m. at Studio 35

After showing one local film during last year's festival, organizers decided it was time to host their first quasi-festival, featuring over 10 short films by Central Ohio filmmakers.

Night After Last, 9 p.m.

Five different storytellers play with the idea of change, spinning tales about moments of change. Also features music by Common Shiner.

Saturday, Jan. 2

Workshops, 11 a.m.

Make LED Blinky Bugs with Fuse Factory, or learn bookbinding with Igloo Letterpress.

Theatre Daedelus performance, 3 p.m.

A play written especially for the festival by three locals.

Improv Show, 8 p.m.

Local comics converge on Wild Goose for some improvisation.

Sunday, Jan. 3

Brunch, 11 a.m.

A celebration of breakfast closes the festival.