Attention all heavyweight New Year's resolutionists battling a demanding and overtly intrusive sweet tooth: Fruit and yogurt smoothies can be a healthy alternative and a low-cal fix for those nagging sugary cravings.

Attention all heavyweight New Year's resolutionists battling a demanding and overtly intrusive sweet tooth: Fruit and yogurt smoothies can be a healthy alternative and a low-cal fix for those nagging sugary cravings.

If your reaction to that advice is a) Yeah, I've heard that before, but can a smoothie really replace a delicious dish of ice cream?, or b) Yeah, I've heard that before, but what a chore trying to make the damn thing, i.e. trying to find a reliable recipe with easily available ingredients -then read on. Because, while trawling through the grocery store the other day, I discovered a product designed to confront those very issues.

What I tried: Yoplait Triple Berry Smoothie ($3.50, 2 servings)

Blending in: To whip this thing up, you only have to dump the contents of the Yoplait plastic packet (which contains just frozen fruit and clumps of cryo-fied yogurt), add milk and let 'er rip.

On the downside, you still have to haul out, engage and contend with the mess of an electric blender. On the upside, you don't have to do anything else - like fight with a sticky spoonful of honey, wash, drain and worry about the amount of fruit you're using, check to see if you have any decent yogurt in the fridge, or sweat over how many ice cubes are going in.

Juicy fruit: Except for the minor hassle of the blade-equipped gadget, preparing this Yoplait smoothie was an absolute breeze and took, seriously, about three minutes. And the result? Well, I was pretty impressed.

I opted for the regular thickness (meaning one cup of skim milk was added, not the cup and a half that was advised for those desiring a consistency that'd be sippable through a straw), and this turned out a near-ice-cream-thick viscosity.

The smoothie had a pleasant purple color, and an even more pleasant flavor of pure and bright fruit tightly balanced by the perfect amount of semi-tart yogurt. There were no off-putting flavors and if served this at a professional dessert stand, I'd be completely content. I'd be even happier still to learn that eight ounces of it contained only 110 nutrient-friendly calories.

Would I eat it again?: I quite liked its good, concentrated flavor obtained by not having to use ice cubes. And while it's certainly no Jeni's (what is?), it is comparable to, if fresher and better-tasting than, many grocery-store-available frozen desserts. So, yes, I would eat it again.

Spot a new supermarket specialty you'd like Taste Test to try? E-mail gbenton@columbusalive.com