Ever wonder what happens when garage punks go acoustic, or whether such a reverse Dylan-at-Newport transition could be pulled off gracefully? Seattle pals Kimberly Morrison and Jesse Lortz (of Flying Dutchmen and Fe Fi Fo Fums fame) are attempting to answer those questions.

Ever wonder what happens when garage punks go acoustic, or whether such a reverse Dylan-at-Newport transition could be pulled off gracefully? Seattle pals Kimberly Morrison and Jesse Lortz (of Flying Dutchmen and Fe Fi Fo Fums fame) are attempting to answer those questions.

As for the sound, The Dutchess and the Duke's breakout 2007 single "Reservoir Park" and two subsequent LPs were dominated by minimal arrangements of laid-back folk tunes - two harmonized voices, a gently strummed guitar and rarely much else. This ain't no "indie-folk" sound, though. They skirt the bitterness/hopefulness threshold with gruffness reminiscent of Leonard Cohen and Eric Burdon.

As for the success? Near universal hallelujahs from the budget rock community suggest nobody's gonna shout "Judas!" anytime soon, and for good reason. If you've a taste for dusty dollar bin folk albums, this ought to hit the spot, even out of its element at the Wex.