DJ duo roeVy, aka Sean Conner and Nate Reese, play their own brand of aggressive house music.

DJ duo roeVy, aka Sean Conner and Nate Reese, play their own brand of aggressive house music.

Elliot Goldenthal, "Fire Water Paper (A Vietnam Oratorio)"

Mystically beautiful. Elliot Goldenthal is one of the most insightful composers of our time, but like many modern composers he has turned to film scoring to put food on the table. Goldenthal pulls no punches here, preferring an unvarnished, intense and at times violent portrayal. Yo-Yo Ma's playing is appropriately intense, though it's surprising that he signed up for such a small solo role.

Goblin, "Goblin, Volume II 1975-1980"

This one's not for beginners delving into the world of Goblin. Goblin isn't a heavy-metal band. This album contains mostly keyboard-heavy instrumental rock that goes back and forth between jazz-rock and progressive rock.Goblin wrote music with unusual syncopations and interesting dissonances, which often reminds people of John Carpenter's soundtracks. In other words, it hypnotizes you and then shocks you.

Basil Poledouris, "RoboCop Original Soundtrack"

Certainly not as long as the famous Conan the Barbarian soundtrack by Poledouris. It's not the composer's fault. The RoboCop theme is one of the most memorable themes ever written for a movie. It perfectly defines Murphy's pain and longing for his old life. The first time seeing RoboCop was a breaking point -the way everything was tied together by the soundtrack was the work of a master composer.

Various Artists, "Gremlins Original Soundtrack"

Purchased this album for the Jerry Goldsmith half, but stayed for the rest. Goldsmith's score is the main character in this fun-filled comedy, and each cue has his signature on it. This album almost answers the question, "What would it sound like if Spike Jones and the City Slickers were to score a horror film?"

John Carpenter, "Greatest Hits V.1"

What can be said about John Carpenter's music? Too cool. This Greatest Hits album celebrates the early days of Carpenter's music genius, starting with his very first movie, Dark Star. The album altogether really gives you a nice contrast on the different flavors similar music can give when done with different instruments - very creepy and very John Carpenter.

Know a local musician who'd like to share their favorite albums with Playlist? E-mail Jesse Tigges at jtigges@columbusalive.com