The only extraordinary thing about Extraordinary Measures is that Brendan Fraser continues to find work.

The only extraordinary thing about Extraordinary Measures is that Brendan Fraser continues to find work.

The wooden and uninspired actor plays John Crowley, a pharmaceutical exec whose paychecks and health insurance go to pay the extraordinary medical bills of his two youngest children, both with Pompe disease, a debilitating and fatal ailment that affects infants.

John is so desperate to find a way to save his children that he turns to Dr. Robert Stonehill (Harrison Ford), a gruff, growly scientist who works more in the theoretical realm than the real one.

With the support of his wife Aileen (a slumming Keri Russell) and eldest son, John quits his job to start a new biotech firm with Stonehill, which is where the film's biggest faults lie.

This is clearly designed to be an emotional journey full of tears and inspirational moments, but the movie gets so bogged down in the technical details of the business and science that it's hard to find the heart. There can be no touching moments when all the talk is about enzymes, venture capitalists, revenue streams and clinical trials.

Based on a true story, Extraordinary Measures does earn points for showcasing a real man who, through his research companies and charitable affiliations, tries to help all those suffering and in need. Maybe that's why he deserves better treatment than this manipulative fluff piece.