How hard do Super Desserts work to schedule practice, shows, interviews, photo shoots and other band-related activities?

How hard do Super Desserts work to schedule practice, shows, interviews, photo shoots and other band-related activities?

"It's like trying to schedule a family reunion with, like, cousins who don't really like each other and the crazy uncle," Eve Searls said. "It's really hard to get everybody together."

Logistics can be a nightmare when your band features a rotating cast of more than two dozen players, but having so many hands in the pot is a dream scenario for the "craft-pop" collective, who have become this city's premier purveyors of polite, peculiar acoustic sing-alongs.

"We kind of take the high school choir approach. The more members we have, the more the sound blends and fills up," Tyler Evans said. "A lot of acoustic bands I see, a lot of their problems come from the fact that they have to try too hard to make their sound full."

Super Desserts, on the other hand, have no trouble reverberating through any room they play, from the tiny Clintonville storefront Wholly Craft all the way up to Bloomington's 640-capacity Buskirk-Chumley Theater. They opened for sometimes-Dessert Erik Kang's main band, Margot & the Nuclear So and So's, at a sold-out show there last year.

Rather, with so many voices and instruments in play, the main struggle (besides all those scheduling conflicts) is building arrangements spare enough to let the songs breathe.

A big part of the band's fantastical aesthetic is the ability to swell from wistful whisper to orchestral rush, a feat they accomplish several times over on Banjo Forever!, a limited-edition vinyl due out next week on upstart label Red Bird Recordings. The band will play Sunday afternoon at Used Kids Records to celebrate the new release.

The new album compiles tracks from Super Desserts' three previous releases - all CD-Rs with handmade packaging, hence the "craft-pop" descriptor - even though the third CD-R won't come out until later this year.

"Banjo Forever!'s like a greatest-hits even though nobody's heard our band," Searls explained.

The plan is for many more folks to hear them in the coming months thanks to an expanding touring schedule. The band played Nelsonville's inaugural Winter Folk Festival alongside Vetiver last weekend, and they've got dates scheduled in Cincinnati, Dayton, Chicago and Madison for the rest of the month. They'll be traveling by caravan, of course.

E-mail your local music news to Chris DeVille at cdeville@columbusalive.com