Edge of Darkness is based on a 1985 British miniseries, and director Martin Campbell certainly tries his best to cram six hours of story into a two-hour feature. But it still feels like there's something missing, and I can only imagine that's the stuff that makes the first half of this convoluted mess make sense.

Edge of Darkness is based on a 1985 British miniseries, and director Martin Campbell certainly tries his best to cram six hours of story into a two-hour feature. But it still feels like there's something missing, and I can only imagine that's the stuff that makes the first half of this convoluted mess make sense.

Thomas Craven (a gruff Mel Gibson) is a Boston cop sent on a revenge mission after he watches as his activist daughter (Bojana Novakovic) is violently gunned down on his own front porch.

Craven soon begins to uncover the web of corruption his daughter was caught up in. There are shady Republican senators, a mysterious British fixer (Ray Winstone) and her former employer, a research facility with government weapons contacts headed by the slick Jack Bennett (a scene-stealing Danny Huston).

It's not until Craven has waded through this overly complicated plot stuff that Gibson can really let loose. Then, the film turns into the satisfying, if generic, revenge flick everyone wanted in the first place.

Although he's best known these days for his movie about Jesus and his drunken anti-Semitic rant, Gibson clearly hasn't lost any of his old talent. He may be more wrinkled, but he's still a mesmerizing figure on screen.

Unfortunately, a complex plot prevents what could have been a taut little thriller from being anything more than an average revenge flick.