Miniature golf courses replete with windmills and even a dinosaur or two still may abound in Columbus, but generally only when you take in the view of the city from its freeways.

Miniature golf courses replete with windmills and even a dinosaur or two still may abound in Columbus, but generally only when you take in the view of the city from its freeways.

Now, for one weekend, you can play a front and back nine right in the heart of Campus as 18 arts organizations each present a handmade hole.

The artist-created course will include a scale model of CCAD's campus created by its students and a pirate ship by Indianapolis arts group Primary Colors, along with others that incorporate electricity, game show reverence, bad family photos, comic book panels and possibly a waterfall. (Holes that incorporated fire, glass bottles and gigantic ladyparts made of green carpet were nixed from the course.)

Participating groups will man each hole with a little information about the organization and the work it does in Columbus, but at the core of the event is following the scorecard and putting below par.

A-Holes Artist Miniature Golf is one of the first Arts in the Alley events Couchfire Collective has pulled together at the South Campus Gateway. While the organizers of Agora and Independents' Day passed on staffing a full-time gallery in the alley (an opportunity seized by the Ohio Art League), they did agree to try and come up with a few events that would engage Campus-dwellers with the arts.

"When Couchfire first started working in the South Campus Gateway, we were trying to come up with ideas that would get people involved in the arts without being pretentious," said Couchfire's Adam Brouillette, A-Hole's key organizer.

According to Brouillette, it took some time for Couchfire - accustomed to being as provocative as it pleases without restriction - to find an idea that would meet with the Gateway's approval.

The artist-created miniature golf course is an idea borrowed from other cities, including New York and Minneapolis. It seemed to be a good, inaugural spring event that plays well with Ohio State's sporty proclivities and weekend love for lawn games.

Future plans for a throwdown among the city's various art schools are in the works, as well as regular short-term Couchfire openings at the OAL gallery. They hope those events can continue to be interesting and provocative.

"I figure that the reason people come to Agora and Independents' Day is that we're not so buttoned-down," said Brouillette.

Couchfire is using A-Holes golf as a catalyst for bringing a number of community groups together.

"Part of Couchfire's mission has been that regardless of whether people want to work with us or not, we'll keep on asking them," said Brouillette. "There are definitely groups involved in this that haven't participated before.

"We had a hard time getting groups like Skylab, CCAD or Mother Artists at Work - groups that seem like they should be so similar and have similar motivations - an opportunity to come together," he continued. "We want to invite more communication between artists and organizations; Columbus is just going to end up a better city that way."