Despite the last blast of snow that accompanied opening weekend, Shadowbox is ready to usher in warmer weather with their latest sketch-and-song offering, the appropriately titled "Spring Fling."

Despite the last blast of snow that accompanied opening weekend, Shadowbox is ready to usher in warmer weather with their latest sketch-and-song offering, the appropriately titled "Spring Fling."

But while the troupe may be ready for the new season, they're not quite as ready for "Spring," a hodgepodge collection that lacks the centralized theme of the better Christmas and sex shows.

"Spring Fever" has a few more trouble spots than usual, but there's still plenty to be pleased about, mostly in the musical portions.

The highlight is a rendition of Santana's "Oye Como Va," complete with a spicy Latin-inspired dance choreographed by Katy Psenicka. That dance interlude has an organic and loose feel that complements the music perfectly.

Bolstered by a showstopping electric violin solo from David Whitehouse, Julie Klein's take on The Who's "Baba O'Riley" closes the first act on a very high note.

Among the other strong musical performances are Mary Randle's "China Groove," Jennifer Hahn's "Every Little Thing She Does is Magic" and J.T. Walker III's "Rock This Town."

Fewer things stand out on the comedy stage. Sketches like "Branding the Bunny," starring an Easter Bunny updated for an adult audience, and "Rock Band Interactive," which adds another level of realism to the popular video game, are fun, but the jokes fall flat.

The biggest crowd pleaser is sure to be "It's Spring Break, Charlie Brown," featuring a slightly older version of the Peanuts gang. The sketch proves that even with boozy location changes, everything in the Peanuts world stays the same.

Also strong is a return of "Jason's Scary Stories," with Jason (Jimmy Mak) recalling his horrific run-in with a gym class dodgeball while his friend Jeremy (Whitehouse) provides a re-enactment through mime (adding his own commentary).

The Mak-Whitehouse duo pairs up again for "Gone Campin'," in which they give sage advice for future camping trips. The concept isn't the most innovative - most of the advice revolves around drinking copious amounts of beer - but it's packed with plenty of punch lines that keep the laughter going.