You get the feeling something's strange about the Jones family right from the opening scenes, as sultry daughter Jenn shoots her dad a come-hither look at the breakfast table and manages to make the word "daddy" feel like a double entendre.

You get the feeling something's strange about the Jones family right from the opening scenes, as sultry daughter Jenn shoots her dad a come-hither look at the breakfast table and manages to make the word "daddy" feel like a double entendre.

No, this isn't your typical father and mother, son and daughter situation.

The Joneses are actually four professional salespeople posing as a family unit (Demi Moore and David Duchovny play the heads of the household) in order to sell their American Dream lifestyle to their rich suburban neighbors. They earn commission for influencing people to buy newer, bigger TVs, expensive video games, designer dresses and perfumes.

It's a take on the decades-old phenomenon of, you know, keeping up with the Joneses. And it's a clever conceit that works well when it's given a black comedy treatment.

Unfortunately, first-time director Derrick Borte tries to give the story more weight than it can handle, tackling some fairly heavy stuff - underage drinking, homosexuality, suicide - in scenes that fall flat.

But the acting is great, especially Gary Cole and Glenne Headly as the next-door couple who's desperate to buy some happiness.

And Duchovny is perfect in this, just the right combination of too-charming salesman and aw-shucks nice guy. His scenes with Moore are a lot of fun - these two have fantastic chemistry. Who knew? Someone should pair them together again, and give them some better material.