Earth Day has an all-are-welcome sort of spirit to it. So does ARTillery's Earth Day Art Market.

Earth Day has an all-are-welcome sort of spirit to it. So does ARTillery's Earth Day Art Market.

The local arts collective has been hosting monthly art markets since December, with each typically focused around a single medium - March featured print work, and May will feature glass.

For Saturday's Earth Day market, about 20 Central Ohio-area vendors hawking all sorts of items will set up shop for the day. And although they aren't required to have Earth-friendly appeal, plenty of the vendors do, director and founding member Eric Rausch said.

Available artwork will run the gamut from apparel and jewelry to ceramics, glass, paintings, photography and homemade mandolins. This market will be the first of the season to be held outdoors, in the South Campus Gateway's Arts in the Alley space just outside ARTillery's headquarters.

The all-encompassing appeal of the Earth Day Art Market reflects ARTillery's efforts to drum up interest in the local arts scene while rallying around a common cause.

"I'm just the kind of person that cares about Earth Day," Rausch said. "I organized an Earth Day fair in high school."

To make the Earth Day Art Market even bigger and better than some of the previous monthly art markets, it won't be all about the shopping. Eco-friendly activities will be going on all day.

Most exciting is a screenprinting station - people can bring an old T-shirt and "upcycle" it with a new design they screenprint themselves.

Attendees are encouraged to bring art supplies for local artist Heather Wirth to use in her traveling Artmobile, which will start visiting elementary schools this fall.

ARTillery members will also be selling handmade ceramic cups and bowls for $20, with profits going to the Mid-Ohio FoodBank. Bowls will be filled with soup from Mad Mex and bread from Panera, while cups come with tea from Aveda, said Rausch, who made some of the pottery himself.

And to round out the spirit of the day, Clintonville author Jason K. Burke, whose children's book "Recycled Again" was featured in Alive a few weeks back, will do a live reading of his book at 2:30 p.m.

Additionally, Aveda will offer free, on-the-spot head and neck massages, and the market will be set to the sounds of live entertainment from high school student-musicians.

Rausch said he has his fingers crossed for big crowds and sunny skies (in case of rain, the market will be happening inside the Gateway Film Center).

"I'd like it to be a really big event," he said. "The only thing missing is the people, because we've got everything else lined up."