Aaron Sturgill had a vision, and he was going to realize it with or without the help of other musicians. So with all the trappings of a rock band and a load of loop pedals, he started making moody instrumental post-rock under the name Old Worlds early last year.

Aaron Sturgill had a vision, and he was going to realize it with or without the help of other musicians. So with all the trappings of a rock band and a load of loop pedals, he started making moody instrumental post-rock under the name Old Worlds early last year.

"People have asked me why I choose to work so strictly within a given genre, and it's because that's exactly where my heart lies," Sturgill said. "I don't see myself doing anything else."

At first, Sturgill would play all the instruments on stage, building drum and guitar loops into cyclical symphonies. Pulling off something so elaborate was nearly impossible alone; fortunately, friends Mike Poston and Brian Maxwell bought into the Appleseed Cast-inspired approach and soon joined on drums and bass, respectively.

The trio frequently deployed its math-y riffs and epic buildups around Columbus last year, sounding like a more melancholy take on the finger-tapping fury of locals Six Gallery or a cerebral cross between Explosions in the Sky and Minus the Bear.

They hoped to use technology to sound much bigger than a three-piece and time-honored classical composition tricks to chart a rise into hope from despair.

"I want the songs to end happier than they begin," Sturgill said. "I want the songs to help people not get lost in the music, but to find some kind of emotional resolution."

The first proper document of that effort is "Such A Willful Creature," a four-song EP set for release Saturday at Rumba Cafe. The pristine recordings are a better fit for this sort of music than the scrappy demo they distributed last year, though "Creature" is only a step toward Sturgill's ultimate goal.

"The next project is the one I've been looking to do my whole life," Sturgill said.

The band hopes to head into Central City Recording to record a full-length later this year once they've saved up some cash and edited down their vast backlog of songs. In the meantime, Old Worlds will embark on several regional weekend tours throughout the spring and summer. It's all very purposeful for Sturgill, who feels like he wasted a lot of years being unfocused and unruly.

"I wish I had gotten a foothold on becoming a local musician at age 20," Sturgill said. "Now I'm 28 and I know exactly what I want to do."