The truck stops here: Taqueria Otro Rollo's white trailer is plastered with color photos of its fare and equipped with a tiny back-end counter fitted with a few stools. Significantly, it provides a peek into the zeitgeist of taco trucking. See, it shares owners with the excellent Mexican bakery it's parked next to (which sells beautiful sweet rolls for pennies) and that bakery is the result of Otro Rollo's initial success.

The truck stops here: Taqueria Otro Rollo's white trailer is plastered with color photos of its fare and equipped with a tiny back-end counter fitted with a few stools. Significantly, it provides a peek into the zeitgeist of taco trucking. See, it shares owners with the excellent Mexican bakery it's parked next to (which sells beautiful sweet rolls for pennies) and that bakery is the result of Otro Rollo's initial success.

But with the bakery successfully up, the owners decided to shut down the taco truck - until taco trucking became such a blossoming trend in town. Now both businesses seem to be attracting regulars.

Specialties of the truck:

Q: What's named after a sandal, is the size of a manhole cover, and eats like an addictive Mexican pizza?

A: Otro Rollo's Huarache.

That huarache is a massive, homemade masa patty - like a sope on steroids - piled high with beans, jalapenos, your meat of choice, cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes, cilantro and on and on. I recommend you get it topped with Otro Rollo's special tinga - a zesty chicken and potato stew.

There's also a "cocina-sinker" of a burger done "estilo Monterrey" (in the style of that northern Mexican town), fortified with bacon and ham and everything else.

If you dare: They sell cabeza (head meat) tacos here, but were out when I visited.

Limited time offers: Otro Rollo's many weekend specials might include pozole (hominy stew), menudo (tripe soup), mole poblana or birria.