They're from nowhere near the historic New York borough, but if Harlem's band name is misleading, their latest album title hits a little closer to home. "Hippies" doesn't conjure images of Bay Area acid rock, but there's something vaguely psychedelic about Matador's Texas twisters and their retro garage rock, like a less fashionable, better-humored version of the Black Lips. Harlem's music isn't as hazy as the Lips, but considering Harlem's last album was called "Free Drugs," the whiff of chemical alteration on these otherwise straightforward nuggets is probably an accurate read.

They're from nowhere near the historic New York borough, but if Harlem's band name is misleading, their latest album title hits a little closer to home. "Hippies" doesn't conjure images of Bay Area acid rock, but there's something vaguely psychedelic about Matador's Texas twisters and their retro garage rock, like a less fashionable, better-humored version of the Black Lips. Harlem's music isn't as hazy as the Lips, but considering Harlem's last album was called "Free Drugs," the whiff of chemical alteration on these otherwise straightforward nuggets is probably an accurate read.