The revolutionary play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" established Edward Albee's brilliance as a playwright early on. Albee had many distinguished achievements since his breakout play, but his most introspective is the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Three Tall Women." The work is clearly Albee's most personal. Written after his adoptive mother's death, it exorcises some inner demons while digging into their estranged relationship.

The revolutionary play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" established Edward Albee's brilliance as a playwright early on. Albee had many distinguished achievements since his breakout play, but his most introspective is the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Three Tall Women." The work is clearly Albee's most personal. Written after his adoptive mother's death, it exorcises some inner demons while digging into their estranged relationship.

In its examination of relationship and loss, the play focuses on three women at different ages - one in her nineties, one in her fifties and another in her mid-twenties - who reminisce and banter about their lives. Local actresses Jane Mowder, Jill Taylor and Kim Sanders will bring Albee's story to the stage starting tonight in a Theatre Daedalus production directed by Erika Twining.