The wares for sale in art festival booths can be a serious investment. Materials used to create high-quality work in wood, stone, ceramics or paint can be costly, not to mention the amount of time and skill it takes for an artist to create his or her work.

The wares for sale in art festival booths can be a serious investment. Materials used to create high-quality work in wood, stone, ceramics or paint can be costly, not to mention the amount of time and skill it takes for an artist to create his or her work.

But there are also many options available at the festival for patrons with more modest means who want something of quality, be it decorative or functional. Here are a few of this year's participating vendors with pieces available for less than $100.

Kensington House

kh-handbags.com

Starting price: $18

What you'll find: Structured handbags in graphic patterns, created by mother of six and former CCAD student Pamela Sapp. Her brightly colored prints adorn mini, clutch, standard and oversized purses, most of which cost around $60, with smaller sizes available for $18 and $25.

Erica Zap

ericazap.com

Starting price: $30

What you'll find: A vast array of jewelry, including bracelets, necklaces and earrings made of mesh, metal and sterling, some with pearls and precious stones. Zap's simple and elegant designs feature dozens of earring options for $30 to $50, as well as some sterling silver rings in that range. The Rhode Island artist's bracelets and necklaces start around $50, with a few options available for men as well.

Karin Connely

kcphotography.com

Starting price: $60

What you'll find: High-quality nature photography, most often examining flowers in detail, or landscapes like beachscapes or the forest floor. Florida photographer Connely spends days, sometimes weeks, in the same settings, looking for "that one decisive moment when all the elements of nature come together in perfect harmony." Matted photographs are the most affordable, but small pieces printed on canvas begin at $85.

Dylan and Amy Engler

englerglass.com

Starting price: $20

What you'll find: Whimsical but functional glass art pieces, including colorful catch-all dishes, antler-shaped bottle stoppers for $36, as well as glass-handled letter openers (starting at $72), cosmetic brushes from $46-$66 and glass pendants as low as $20. Their brightly colored water droplet "splash" bowls range from $28 to $68. Also popular are their web-shaped bowls, which start at $38.

Jack Pine

jackpinestudio.com

Starting price: $32

What you'll find: Circleville native and glass artist Jack Pine explored several avenues in glassmaking before deciding to be true to his roots (and vines), by creating glass gourds and pumpkins for his hometown's celebrated annual festival. Made in multiple sizes, shapes and colors, Pine's work may be whimsical in nature, but the quality is elegant - or, in fairy tale parlance, more chariot-like. Small pumpkins start at $32, and the price goes up according to size and color.

Mary Christian

mnartists.org

Starting price: $25

What you'll find: Wearable fiber art, including jackets made of chenille, velvet, tapestry and other fabrics. The Minnesota artist's dramatic lines, quilting and involved handiwork result in one-of-a-kind pieces. Her scarves are made from the scraps left over from her jackets, and cost $25. The jackets themselves - which are the majority of her inventory - range from $90 up to $250.

Starfish Clothes

starfishclothes.com

Starting price: $28

What you'll find: Floppy hats, clothing, wristlets and belts, along with textile and leather handbags, many of which feature Michelle Ishida's loving vision of trees. Working with unused but recycled fabrics, Central Ohio's own green fashion designer adds a new species of trees to her line annually and donates a portion of her proceeds to the National Arbor Day Foundation.

Mark Brabant

hoveringobject.com

Starting price: $25

Cleveland artist Brabant explores the multiple possibilities of alien abduction and other perils and delights of the sky in his boldly colored serigraph prints. Cows, dogs, children and trucks all ascend to the heavens, while other characters seem to take refuge in the sights of the sky and its possibilities for escape.