Attack Attack! has always elicited extreme reactions, and never more so than when the Columbus screamo band's "Stick Stickley" video became a viral hit last summer for all the wrong reasons.

Attack Attack! has always elicited extreme reactions, and never more so than when the Columbus screamo band's "Stick Stickley" video became a viral hit last summer for all the wrong reasons.

Blogs, message boards and social-networking sites circulated the clip, mercilessly skewering the band for its genre-splicing brew of metal guitars, emo harmonies and club beats. Bile-filled comments derided the music as "crabcore" in reference to the teenage band's coordinated low-hanging, head-banging guitar stance.

"We've been hated on since day one of this band," singer-guitarist Johnny Franck said over the phone this week. "One of the reasons we've gained success is because people are hating on us It's what happens. You can't gain success and have everyone like you."

And they've certainly found success. Relentless touring behind debut "Someday Came Suddenly" helped Attack Attack! become one of the biggest stars in the youth-centric mall-punk universe that orbits around Warped Tour, MySpace and Hot Topic.

Attack Attack! received by far their most enthusiastic response at Austin's South by Southwest festival, in part because they attracted an entirely different set of fans. Haters gon' hate, but the kids who love this band love them with an intensity to match, turning each concert into an orgy of enthusiasm.

The band does what they can to feed into the fury, whether by staging a humongous chicken fight or holding a front-flip competition off the stage.

"The amount of energy you put out on stage, kids are going to match that intensity," Franck said, "And I feel like they do a very, very good job at that."

The intensity will return to the home front this weekend as the band plays Newport Music Hall to celebrate their second, self-titled album before taking off for another summer on Warped Tour. The record, due out Tuesday, is the first to feature keyboardist Caleb Shomo as lead screamer after Nick Barham's departure last year.

"He's a big dude, and he's got a big scream," Franck said. "He makes everything we do sound a lot more heavy and ballsy."

Besides the new vocalist, Franck said the new album features a more streamlined take on the same mutant musical formula.

"We just put all the stuff that's fun to play and fun to listen to from the last record," he said, "and made it better."