Think of all the plays you'd love to see Jonathan Putnam and Geoffrey Nelson perform together before they step down from their respective posts as associate and artistic directors of CATCO. (One word: "Godot.")

Think of all the plays you'd love to see Jonathan Putnam and Geoffrey Nelson perform together before they step down from their respective posts as associate and artistic directors of CATCO. (One word: "Godot.")

Although we've got to settle for Charles Ludlam's 1984 piece of supernatural silliness "The Mystery of Irma Vep," we'll take what we can get. The opportunity to see the two of them ham it up together for what could be the last time should not be resisted.

Vampires, werewolves, Hitchcock, Poe, Shakespeare, Indiana Jones, bad puns and jokes that were old when Tutankhamun told them - it's all thrown together and played by the two veteran actors in perfect deadpan. And often in drag.

Add in D. Glen Vanderbilt Jr.'s versatile set, Cynthia Turnbull's hilariously cross-gendered costumes, Mary Tarantino's comically spooky lighting and Keya Myers-Alkire's evocative sounds, and "Irma Vep" becomes a feast for the senses, non- and otherwise.

Nelson impressively fills out the hideous dresses of the glamorous Lady Enid Hillcrest. But he also does a great Peter Lorre impression as an unscrupulous and mysterious Egyptian guide.

It's in that same scene where Putnam's Lord Edgar Hillcrest shows his derring-do, ascending and descending the treacherous Riffe Center Studio Two grandstands into the bowels of a mummy's tomb.

Of course, to paraphrase Putnam as the Hillcrests' proper housekeeper Jane Twisden, CATCO has been descending for decades.

Before Nelson and Putnam descend for the final time, hear them "speak the unspeakable and name the unnamable" of Ludlam. After that final descent, as Samuel Beckett might have said, there's "nothing to be done."