Here's a fun question: What do Russell Crowe, Viggo Mortensen, Gerard Butler and Robert Downey Jr. have in common? Besides starring in a few of the best films of all time, they've all appeared in uniform - i.e., in "drag."

Here's a fun question: What do Russell Crowe, Viggo Mortensen, Gerard Butler and Robert Downey Jr. have in common? Besides starring in a few of the best films of all time, they've all appeared in uniform - i.e., in "drag."

If you think this interpretation of drag (with a capital, yet tastefully stylized "D") is the most recent PC take on what's basically assumed to be "men in dresses," it isn't, at least not according to photographer and author John Sherman Lathram III.

His first exhibition, currently on view at the Arts in the Alley Initiative space, cleverly explores the relationship of the uniform and female illusion.

Using 15 large-scale images taken from the photographer's recently published debut book, "The Ladies of Ohio: Digital Divas: A Photo Documentary of Ohio Female Illusion Culture," Lathram makes an effective argument that men (and women) who wear certain types of clothes to work, school or the bar are no different than the (primarily) men who work as entertainers.

The images - all taken from local drag performances over the past two years - showcase the gamut of female illusion, from the serious (and circuit-ready) to the big-haired and fembot-y.

Since the exhibit is a play on double meanings, there's no shortage of playfulness with names like "Penny Traition" or "Dee Ranged," and ditto for the "celebrity" close-ups.

Lathram timed the exhibit (and book release) to coincide with Pride month, and both are hits you shouldn't miss.