For the uninitiated, it would be easy to take a spin through Frog Eyes' latest, "Paul's Tomb: A Triumph," and reduce Carey Mercer's band to a knockoff of Spencer Krug's work with Wolf Parade and Sunset Rubdown. But Krug did time in Frog Eyes before going on to greater prominence with acts of his own, undoubtedly having learned a few tricks from Mercer.

For the uninitiated, it would be easy to take a spin through Frog Eyes' latest, "Paul's Tomb: A Triumph," and reduce Carey Mercer's band to a knockoff of Spencer Krug's work with Wolf Parade and Sunset Rubdown. But Krug did time in Frog Eyes before going on to greater prominence with acts of his own, undoubtedly having learned a few tricks from Mercer.

The Frog Eyes maestro was at the forefront of Canada's incestuous cadre of indie-rock weirdos. For a decade now, he's been kicking out a steady stream of claustrophobic epics - tortured but triumphant, rooted in familiar rock trappings but skewed toward the bizarre and intensely personal.

For those not in tune with Mercer's literary flavor and emotional headspace, his music runs the risk of sounding like an indulgent escape for wounded LARP enthusiasts. But whether or not you can stomach poetry about "emaciated foresters dancing in the moonlight," Mercer's neurotic art-rock taps into something primal, the connection bolstered by unhinged vocals reminiscent of Krug's, but with healthy tinges of fellow mad visionaries David Thomas and Jamie Stewart.

Seattle's significantly more conventional Pearly Gate Music will open next Thursday's show.