The U.S. is in good position to advance out of Group C thanks to a 1-1 draw in Saturday's World Cup showdown with former colonial oppressors England. Much of the credit goes to English goalie Robert Green, whose flub of Clint Dempsey's long-range shot resulted in the Americans' tying goal.

The U.S. is in good position to advance out of Group C thanks to a 1-1 draw in Saturday's World Cup showdown with former colonial oppressors England. Much of the credit goes to English goalie Robert Green, whose flub of Clint Dempsey's long-range shot resulted in the Americans' tying goal.

As the U.S. prepares for its second and third matches in group play Friday and Wednesday, let's look back on a few more notorious mistakes in recent World Cup history.

Andres Escobar, Colombia

Every athlete's worst nightmare: Escobar accidentally scored on his own goalie in a 1994 group stage match that the U.S. would go on to win 2-1. Less than two weeks later, Escobar was shot 12 times outside El Indio restaurant in Medellin.

Roberto Baggio, Italy

After scoring five goals in three games to topple Nigeria, Spain and Bulgaria en route to the 1994 final, "The Divine Ponytail" stepped up to take Italy's final penalty kick in the shootout versus Brazil. He sent it over the crossbar to seal his country's defeat. Baggio rebounded to score twice in the 1998 World Cup and remains legendary in his country.

David Beckham, England

The global superstar went from the toast of England to national pariah in 1998 after earning a red card for kicking an opponent in the Brits' tournament-ending loss to Argentina. British tabloid The Mirror lambasted Beckham: "Ten Heroic Lions, One Stupid Boy." Beckham would go on to regain face with a string of brilliant performances; two years later he became England's captain.

Diego Maradona, Argentina

The tournament has seen its fair share of officiating errors, none more famous than the oversight that allowed Diego Maradona's 1986 goal against England, known as "The Hand of God." As five-foot-five Maradona and six-foot-one British goalkeeper Peter Shilton lept for a loose ball in the box, the diminutive striker punched the ball into the net with his left hand. Both squads stood stunned, expecting the tally to be called back and Maradona to be carded, but referee Ali Bin Nasser counted it. He later said hemorrhoid treatment affected his vision.