A short march away from this country's first soccer-specific stadium, some of the Crew's diehard fans have established their own Columbus soccer landmark.

A short march away from this country's first soccer-specific stadium, some of the Crew's diehard fans have established their own Columbus soccer landmark.

A month ago, Hudson Street Hooligans opened their own private club at the corner of Summit Street and Oakland Avenue, where soccer devotees have since convened daily to guzzle booze and watch the World Cup or prepare for the march to nearby Crew Stadium.

Despite migrating to a new location, the supporters group plans to maintain ties with Ruby Tuesday, where they have gathered on game days since forming in 2006.

"We wanted a place to go every day of the week to watch soccer," co-owner Blake Compton said. "Ruby's is great for Crew and national team game days, but not every day of the week are they open and watching soccer."

So last winter Compton joined co-owners Grant Thurmond and Jon Winland in renting the storefront and transforming it into a superfan mecca, replete with soccer paraphernalia, flat-screen TVs, high-end draft and bottled beer and a foosball machine where most bars would keep their pool table.

In order to obtain a cheaper liquor license, the Hooligans opted to open the bar as a private club, so patrons must buy a membership to drink there - a $10 social membership or $20 for full Hooligan status with T-shirt and embroidered patch.

Compton plans to start selling tickets for the Nordecke at Hooligans throughout the week, though he returned to Ruby's for ticket sales in the hours before Saturday's 2-0 win over D.C. United. He said the Ruby's crowd was thinner than usual, but he attributed that partially to the hangover from the U.S. national team's World Cup loss to Ghana earlier that day.

"It was a long day for a lot of soccer fans," Compton said.

Hooligans has been busy throughout the World Cup, and Compton doesn't expect much of a dip in business once the tournament concludes thanks to the glut of global soccer that airs year-round. He and his partners have a lot of faith in the continued growth of soccer fan culture in Columbus and what it means for a business like theirs.

"I think we just realized we progressed to the point that we could attempt to do something like this," Compton said.