It's a fact of life: Unusual things attract attention.

It's a fact of life: Unusual things attract attention.

Biggie Smalls, an art show of oversized and tiny works in its second year, is getting plenty of attention. And reveling in it.

The Junctionview Studios event has Columbus artists - some studio regulars, some just breaking into the art scene - creating (mostly two-dimensional) works of a disproportionate scale.

"The contrast between big and small artwork has always intrigued me," said Marina Goldshteyn, one of the show's organizers. "Just because something is small doesn't make it less valued or beautiful. Also, it is nice to challenge artists with themes, and this one will be fun - to see people who normally work large do small pieces, and vice-versa."

In 2009, the show was a more low-key occasion that featured Goldshteyn and co-organizer Carolyn Slebodnik's favorite artist friends, Slebodnik said. This year, it will include the work of 60 artists, including several who are submitting more than one piece.

Most will be drawings and paintings, but some artists who work in ceramics and sculpture will also be featured.

The goal, she said, is to have show-goers take home original artwork. The mini canvases come with mini prices, which makes that mark a little easier to meet.

Plus, more fun will come in the form of raffle items from Wholly Craft, Blick Art Materials, Seagull Bags and Betty's, and four hours of live music ending with DJ Self Help, who starts at 11 p.m.