Police procedurals are generally deemed hit ("Law & Order") or miss ("CSI: Miami") based on their characters. Because you're pretty much assured of the outcome: the cop catches the bad guy.

Police procedurals are generally deemed hit ("Law & Order") or miss ("CSI: Miami") based on their characters. Because you're pretty much assured of the outcome: the cop catches the bad guy.

A&E Network's new cop drama, "The Glades," doesn't mess with this formula and just assumes you'll like the leading man, detective Jim Longworth (Matt Passmore).

Longworth is a former Chicago homicide detective who, after being wrongfully accused of sleeping with his captain's wife - and shot in the ass by said captain - moves to the sleepy town of Palm Glade, Florida. He got a hefty payout, and now all he wants is respite from the hustle and bustle of big-city crime and to work on his golf game.

But all his best-laid plans get cast aside when a headless corpse pops up in the swamp. Now he has to use his brilliant detective skills to figure out who the dead person is and why they're dead. Spoiler alert: He figures it out.

Passmore is likable as a rebellious, quick-witted detective who spars with his co-workers and superiors, making his time on screen light-hearted and sometimes humorous.

The trouble is supporting characters who are forced to play second fiddle while getting stuck with poor material. The best of the worst is Longworth's love interest, Callie (Kiele Sanchez), a guarded nurse with a 12-year-old son and a husband in prison. She averts the detective's advances, but we know where this will end.

On the plus side, the interaction between Callie's son and her suitor is thoughtful without being too cutesy. On the negative side, Sanchez is best known for being half of the least-popular "Lost" couple ever - Paulo and Nikki. Callie isn't Nikki-bad here, but Sanchez has to struggle with a bland and conventional character.

As far as procedurals go, "The Glades" does what it's supposed to - gives us a charismatic lead and some quick and dirty storytelling - pretty well. But those supporting roles need work and it's still a procedural.