If Spoon's latest album seems uglier, nastier or simply rawer than we've come to expect from the minimal, snappy Austin quartet, it's only because "Transference" represents the band unfiltered and unfettered for the first time in years.

If Spoon's latest album seems uglier, nastier or simply rawer than we've come to expect from the minimal, snappy Austin quartet, it's only because "Transference" represents the band unfiltered and unfettered for the first time in years.

"It's a record of a very singular mind," frontman Britt Daniel explained.

Spoon has had a lot of positive experiences working with producers and intends to work that way again someday, but this time out the band decided to produce the album themselves.

"I just wanted it to be - the word that always springs to my mind is 'hardcore,'" Daniel said. "It doesn't sound like Black Flag, but it's like hardcore us."

In this case, that meant a willingness to run with the most satisfying version of a song, regardless of fidelity or sonic consistency, rather than cater to a producer's vision. The approach brought Daniel's prickly, economical guitar to the forefront and lent tracks like "Written in Reverse" a considerable pounding heft.

"The intention wasn't to be uglier. It was just to do things our own way," Daniel said, "and I thought that being uglier might be a consequence of that Sometimes the best version is the one we recorded to cassette."

The slight changes don't alter the fact that "Transference" is a Spoon album through and through. Airtight punk-informed arrangements meld with a soulful rock sway that Daniel and drummer Jim Eno have been cultivating for more than a decade, slowly evolving from Pixies copycats into one of indie music's most distinct songwriting forces.

A career's worth of music will be on display Monday when the band headlines CD101 Summerfest at LC Pavilion, an event sure to be bittersweet in light of longtime programming director "Andyman" Davis' recent death. Spoon posted a tribute to Davis on their Facebook page upon learning of his death.

"I had met him very briefly," Daniel said. "He's responsible for playing our music quite a bit. Columbus has been a real supportive city and that's been a real supportive station."

Though they're in the thick of touring for "Transference," Spoon's key members are beginning to set their sights on what's next, including some surprising side projects.

"Jim's been talking about doing a children's record," Daniel said. "And I'd like to compose something. Maybe car commercials."