Treat your makeup brushes the way you treat your hair. That's the best way to ensure utensils' longevity and cleanliness, according to Tim Maurer, creator and president of Mukha Custom Cosmetics.

Treat your makeup brushes the way you treat your hair.

That's the best way to ensure utensils' longevity and cleanliness, according to Tim Maurer, creator and president of Mukha Custom Cosmetics.

If brushes aren't cleaned regularly - every three or four weeks - they can cause breakouts and alter how well makeup applies to the skin.

"You're picking up your oil, your bacteria and spreading it everywhere," Maurer explained. "Powder won't go on the same because skin cells essentially create a skin over the product."

Brushes that use natural hair - squirrel, goat or any other sort of animal fur - should be washed with shampoo and then conditioned using your regular conditioner. If treated correctly, they'll last 30 years or longer.

"You should never need to buy another one," Maurer said.

Brushes with synthetic bristles can be washed with shampoo or Dial soap.

Maurer shared some insider tips about how to keep our utensils and skin clean.

Always wash a new brush before using it. "Nearly every synthetic brush is sprayed with something like a pesticide to keep bugs off," Maurer said, and natural hair brushes could have any sort of little creatures in them.

"Never, ever, ever, ever use soap and water" on a brush with natural hair bristles, he said.

Don't immerse the entire brush in water. That tactic can damage the ferrule, the metal part of the brush that holds the bristles in place.

After shaping wet bristles, dry brushes by laying them flat on a table with the bristles sticking out over the edge. Standing brushes up to dry - say, in a cup - doesn't let the water drain out. "It'll ruin your brush," Maurer said.

Only makeup artists need to use brush cleanser. "It's a waste for the general public to buy," Maurer said. "It's a huge marketing ploy. It's lies."

Buy disposable, latex-free sponges instead of reusing the pads that come in compacts.

Frequently wipe down utensils such as eyelash curlers with rubbing alcohol.

Because there isn't a way to clean mascara brushes, it's important to replace mascara monthly. "There's a zoo living in your mascara after a month," Maurer said. "If you knew what lives in there, you wouldn't wear it."