Well-established shopping districts weren't on Alex Minturn's radar when he began looking for a place to open his part-studio, part-shop.

Well-established shopping districts weren't on Alex Minturn's radar when he began looking for a place to open his part-studio, part-shop.

An artist and product of Columbus' South Side, he went directly to South Parsons Avenue - occasionally touted as the next area of town that will undergo a revival - and opened Studio 1000 in April.

The shop offers local artists' - including Minturn's - work as well as a wide-ranging collection of antique and vintage decor.

"I've had a couple people say, 'Oh, this belongs in the Short North,' " he said. "And I'm like, 'No, it actually belongs right where it is. Right here on Parsons Avenue.' "

It's getting noticed thanks to the storefront's quirky window displays, which will be all done up this weekend for the launch of AX, Minturn's handmade men's and women's clothing line that features his skull- and military-themed designs. Most are made from woodblock stamps, and each one is unique.

The window displays for the event will include Studio 1000's mannequin mascot, Betty, and her entourage, a collection of department store mannequins from the 1940s through '80s, in a series of mock scenes. Their crazy, constantly changing wigs have been getting attention since Studio 1000 opened in April.

"I make it fun and crazy, and people stop in because of the window more than anything," Minturn said.

Also in flux - and equally quirky - is the store's inventory. Minturn's wall hangings are infused by mid-century-modern shapes and colors, created with a palette knife. Other local artists' paintings are featured, and Minturn hopes to include a breadth of media in the future.

"I'd like to have a lot of the things in here actually handmade, whether it's fabric art, pottery, other paintings," he said.

The retail end includes a wide range of items, including an ancient (and uncomfortable-looking) wooden chair with exposed cushion springs and a sheet covered with a fantasy-looking "man on the moon" pattern.

Minturn owned a similar - although much larger - store, called Alexander & Rhodes, with a partner in Mount Vernon. A majority of his vintage items come from that inventory or his personal collection.

Now in the Ganther's Place neighborhood, his small-time start and comparably lower rent has allowed him to respond to the interests of the neighborhood.

In fact, Minturn said he's collaborating with a neighborhood 14-year-old to reproduce some of her artwork for a line of Studio 1000 greeting cards.