More eye-poppingly clever than substantially good, "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World" is every fanboy's summer movie wet dream.

More eye-poppingly clever than substantially good, "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World" is every fanboy's summer movie wet dream.

Based on Bryan Lee O'Malley's six-part independent comic book series, the movie is overwrought with anime influence, sarcastic detachment and video game-style violence.

Not to mention it stars Michael Cera, one of the stars of cult favorite "Arrested Development," fighting it out with the future Captain America (Chris Evans) and a former Superman (Brandon Routh), among others.

Oh, and he also fights an uber-cute lesbian in pigtails (Mae Whitman, who, coincidentally, guest-starred on "Development" as the girlfriend of Cera's character).

If those references do nothing for you, though, "Scott Pilgrim" is going to seem annoyingly smug - and the nonstop barrage of comic, gamer and indie-rock references will quickly wear thin.

One thing everyone will agree on, though, is that Cera has now officially played this character one too many times. Much like the guys he's played in "Development," "Juno" and "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist," Scott Pilgrim is an awkward loser with limited ambition and potential whose good-guy routine somehow manages to attract the attention of a girl way out of his league.

For Scott, that girl is Ramona Flowers (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), an American escaping her tortured past by delivering Amazon packages in Toronto. Little does he know that in order to win her heart, he must defeat her seven evil exes.

Having earned his own cult following with films like "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz," director Edgar Wright was an ideal choice for this project - even if his fancy graphics and nerdy references can sometimes be a bit too clever.

The film is ultimately saved by its spectacular young supporting cast, which also includes "Up in the Air's" Anna Kendrick as Scott's sister; Mark Webber, Alison Pill and Johnny Simmons as Scott's Sex Bob-Omb bandmates (it's a Mario reference); Ellen Wong as Scott's most recent girlfriend Knives Chau; and a scene-stealing Kieran Culkin as Scott's gay roommate/bedmate Wallace Wells.