It's a good thing our marketing gal, Alexis, offered to try out the raw foods diet with me in solidarity, because otherwise I probably would've given up before I even started.

It's a good thing our marketing gal, Alexis, offered to try out the raw foods diet with me in solidarity, because otherwise I probably would've given up before I even started.

Raw foodists consume uncooked, unprocessed foods (nothing can be heated above 104 degrees). Raw foods, they say, are easily digestible and packed with nutrients lost during the cooking process. They give you more energy, make you feel younger and can even relieve some chronic illnesses.

Simplicity was the biggest thing that appealed to me about raw foods, but some of the recipes in a raw foods cookbook I flipped through called for dozens of exotic ingredients. That's not something I need to add into my already hectic life.

Instead, I just bought a ton of fruits and vegetables. Just filling my cart with leafy greens made me feel immediately more peaceful and centered.

I found some simple meals that worked for me, like a chilled avocado soup with lime and jalapeno that tasted sort of like pureed guacamole.

I made mistakes, like assuming my sprouted-grain Ezekiel bread was raw, when it's actually a transitional food that's cooked at (gasp!) 250 degrees. I controversially ate raw fish despite the fact that most raw foodists are also vegan.

I overdid it on the raw almonds and don't think I'll be eating nuts again for a while.

Am I going to stick with raw foods? Nope. I like what roasting and broiling and sauteeing does to foods far too much to go totally raw. But whenever I get that perpetually hungover feeling, I'll probably give it another quick whirl.