We've all seen the commercial for Shake Weight and laughed at its absurdity. Even "SNL" and "The Daily Show" have had their fun with the product's unorthodox "workout" technique.

We've all seen the commercial for Shake Weight and laughed at its absurdity. Even "SNL" and "The Daily Show" have had their fun with the product's unorthodox "workout" technique.

All kidding aside, the Shake Weight promises a total upper-body workout more effective than traditional free weights. I had to know if the joke was on us - and the Shake Weight really worked.

I dropped $29.99 on a Shake Weight for Men - subjecting myself to endless ridicule from friends and co-workers - just to give Alive readers the answer and put my glamour muscles to the test.

The Shake Weight exercise philosophy is based on maintaining the proper form. This is true for all workouts, so it isn't the revolutionary concept the advertisements push. And no, the Shake Weight isn't battery-operated - it just relies on your ability to shake.

The five-pound weight comes with an instructional DVD to ensure you're getting an effective workout - a cycle consisting of 30-second reps of three different exercises with some rest and stretching activities in between.

First is the infamous exercise from the ads: both hands holding the weight chest-high and shaking for 30 seconds to work your chest, arm and lateral muscles.

Next is the bicep exercise, done with each arm held parallel to the ground at shoulder height. To finish, you shake the weight behind your head to work your triceps and shoulders.

That's it - six minutes and you're done. Does it work?

Any professional trainer will say you need 20 minutes of continuous exercise to be considered an effective workout. And while the workout did cause my heart-rate to increase slightly, there were no lasting effects - not even when I tried the routine three times in a row for a full 20 minutes.

That next-day burn that usually accompanies a good workout was sorely lacking.