Look at any gym's class schedule, and you're likely to find at least a few Zumba sessions. What is Zumba? No, it's not a robotic vacuum cleaner. It's a Latin dance-inspired fitness craze that's getting women of all ages shaking their hips.

Look at any gym's class schedule, and you're likely to find at least a few Zumba sessions. What is Zumba? No, it's not a robotic vacuum cleaner. It's a Latin dance-inspired fitness craze that's getting women of all ages shaking their hips.

I needed some exercise after eating my way through a bunch of Chicago-style pizzas, so I decided to give Zumba a shot.

The class I attended had a mixed group of ladies. We followed the instructor's choreography, which borrowed moves from merengue and salsa. While most of the dance steps only worked the waist down, our instructor incorporated arm movements that kept our arms and backs from being neglected.

We danced to hip-hop and Shakira songs, with some intensely fast reggaeton thrown in to get our heart rates up. It was music that makes you want to move, and that helped the time fly by.

We shimmied. We shook our booties. And you know what? It was fun. It didn't feel like a workout. But maybe that's because I went to a less strenuous version of the class.

Not all of a Zumba class is based off Latin moves, though. Part of the Zumba philosophy encourages "world music." In my class, we kicked our knees in the air and snapped our fingers during the traditional Greek zorba. But unfortunately, country songs apparently fall into the "world music" category - we were forced to dance to "Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)."

Honestly, the class was a good time, and it provided a moderate amount of exercise. I'll probably go again. But I think it would be more fun and equally beneficial to go out salsa dancing.