Admittedly, we movie critics can be a cruel and heartless lot. Just ask any fan of Adam Sandler comedies or the "Twilight" movies.

Admittedly, we movie critics can be a cruel and heartless lot. Just ask any fan of Adam Sandler comedies or the "Twilight" movies.

So when a recent screening of "Get Low" leaves a roomful of critics sniffling back tears (yes, myself included), you know it's something special.

Felix Bush (Robert Duvall) is a grizzled hermit living in Kentucky in the 1930s. He's a recluse with a sign greeting visitors to his property with "No damn trespassing. Beware of mule." It's unclear if this refers to an actual mule or just Felix.

After four decades alone, Felix ventures out with a plan. He decides that he wants to throw a funeral for himself while he's still alive, inviting anyone and everyone with a story to tell about him.

His plan finds an ally in the director (Bill Murray) of a struggling funeral home, whose earnest assistant (Lucas Black) grapples with a moral dilemma over Felix's grand plan.

"Get Low" is a small film packed with big feeling. Director Aaron Schneider has created something as warm and wonderful as Kentucky bourbon.

The story gently works its way through a quirky and quite funny opening half that builds steam for a moving and critic-tear-inducing finale.

The cast is a delight, including a wry Murray and support from Sissy Spacek. But Duvall's performance is the reason to see the film. He's done the codger with a heart before, but he's never been better. He should practice his Oscar speech now.