Next to Bethia Woolf's wine glass was a fragment of scrap paper crammed with freshideas,restaurants to visit, timetables to consider. Over drinks at the Burgundy Room,Woolf wasdescribing herjourney fromOxford-educated OSU women's rowing coachto popular food blogger.

Next to Bethia Woolf's wine glass was a fragment of scrap paper crammed with freshideas,restaurants to visit, timetables to consider. Over drinks at the Burgundy Room,Woolf wasdescribing herjourney fromOxford-educated OSU women's rowing coachto popular food blogger.

That unlikely sojourn included becoming a Mexican street cart expert and opening acompany that leads dining pilgrims through Columbusneighborhood- and cuisine-themed eating tours. During her bubbly, culinary-luminary and upcoming-project-filled recitation, I noticed Woolfoccasionally squeezingmore tidbits onto that overtaxed snippet of paper.

To say that Woolf is a food blogger is like saying thatslip of paper had words on it. Currently, she's overseeing/co-piloting fourwidely scanned blogs and websites.

It all started in 2008 with hungrywoolf.com. A photo-filled and well-written chronicle ofher interests in all things edible, the blog waslaunched in partto share Woolf's exciting Columbus food experiences with her friendsand parents back in England.

Serendipitously, it also ledto her meetinglike-minded dining fanatics such as Jim Ellison (cmhgourmand.com) and the people at Slow Food Columbus.

Always hungry for more, in 2009 Woolf co-founded (with Ellison and Slow Fooder Andy Dehus) the sitethat would bring her tons of fans and media attention- tacotruckscolumbus.com.

Interestingly, TTC was hatched ina Latin Americangeography class Woolf tookduring her final year as rowing coach. Cleverly devising a research project that involved new friends Ellison and Dehus while also combining her love of food with the class's mapping techniques, the threeset out with pens, paper and adventurous appetites.

When I askedWoolf about TTC's surprising discoveries,she laughed and said, "I think we thought we might find 10 trucks." Today, thefrequently updated TTC lists about three dozen.

Never one to consider hermission accomplished,Woolf and pals began cataloguingthe city's lesser-known "hole-in-the-wall"ethnic eateries on alteatscolumbus.com, and more recentlythey've started tackling the hot non-Latino food cart scene with streeteatscolumbus.com.

The restless Woolf's latest projects often propel her beyond cyberspace.Taking a bold leapinto the 3-D world, last month she beganColumbus Food Adventures, wherebycurious readers canfeast on Woolf's favorite localfood finds in small-group guided tours.

If Woolf's current ambitions - like a potential street food festival - far exceed her initial aspirations,her motivation remainsthe same:"I'm just trying to show off Columbus in the best way possible." I only hope she never runs out of paper.