Jacob Wooten has been throwing music events nearly as long as he's been attending them. Now, at age 26, his reputation is cemented as a go-to guy for large-scale blowouts and rallying the Columbus music community behind a pressing cause.

Jacob Wooten has been throwing music events nearly as long as he's been attending them. Now, at age 26, his reputation is cemented as a go-to guy for large-scale blowouts and rallying the Columbus music community behind a pressing cause.

Wooten made headlines recently by buying Oldfield's on High with longtime associate Nick Wolak and re-branding it as Kobo. But his career as a promoter stretches back to his days at Westerville North High School.

A decade ago, Wooten saw friends' bands play at an American Legion hall and realized, "I could do that." So he did, recruiting DIY fixture and future Sweatin' promoter Scott Niemet to help throw a series of successful all-ages concerts.

"I kind of enjoyed having control over something that was entertaining," Wooten said.

After graduating high school in 2002, Wooten focused more on playing music than promoting it, but in April 2006, he re-launched his event-planning career with an Earth Day benefit concert. The following year he threw a benefit show for the Columbus AIDS Task Force.

Then came a watershed opportunity: Wolak offered Wooten a job organizing annual fetish ball Trauma. Planning the massive event was overwhelming, but the experience taught him about mobilizing varied factions behind a cause.

Furthermore, Trauma's charitable arm, which provides Thanksgiving dinner for needy families, reinforced his fervor for benefit concerts. This year alone he's helped plan fundraisers for Haiti earthquake sufferers, gunfire victim Alix Reese and the family of CD101's late Andyman Davis.

"In a perfect world, I wish I never had to do any benefits," Wooten said, "but I'm glad there's enough interest in the community to pull together and help someone in need."

Supporting the community is Wooten's mantra for Kobo, too. He hopes the bar can be a boon for Columbus music even outside its four walls, a philosophy borrowed from his friends at Central City Recording.

"They continue to support the bands that supported their business," Wooten said. "I don't see why you can't do that with a bar."

Wooten's ambitions extend beyond the music realm. The proud owner of a pit bull named Weber, he aspires to open a shelter for the maligned breed someday.

"I feel like they're the underdog. They have a bad rep because of what certain people use the dog for," Wooten said. "As soon as I met my pit bull, I'd never met a sweeter dog or a cuter dog."