Regions are usually famous for one type of wine, but sometimes regional grape growers try something totally different. These unusual offerings are easily overlooked.

Regions are usually famous for one type of wine, but sometimes regional grape growers try something totally different. These unusual offerings are easily overlooked.

For insight, we talked to Roger Gentile, who owns Gentile's in Grandview and who earned the John Daniel Award for Wine Education after four decades of teaching wine classes at Ohio State.

From among his shop's selection, he suggested three off-the-beaten-path options: a pinot noir (usually from France's Burgundy region) from Chile, a malbec (typically from Argentina) from California and a cabernet franc from Canada (where it is becoming more popular).

Apaltagua Reserva Pinot Noir (2009)

Silky and creamy, with bright aromas of cherries and spice. "Something new is pinot noir from Chile," Gentile said. "Soft edges give way to a lovely, almost creamy mouth impression."

Region: Curico, Chile

Cost: $13

Pair it with: Grilled salmon or roasted, herbed chicken

Peirano Malbec (2008)

Less of a chocolate taste than most malbecs and slightly tannic, with aromas of tobacco and dark berries. "Malbec is better known as an Argentine staple - very few producers outside of Argentina or Cahors offer a malbec, but this California family hit the mark," Gentile said.

Region: Lodi, California

Cost: $13

Pair it with: Grilled steak with peppers and redskin potatoes

Pelee Island Cabernet Franc (2008)

Plummy and rustic, with some deep colors and atypical richness. "Hell, this wine is more obscure than the person that came in fifth at the Tour de France," Gentile said.

Region: Pelee Island, Canada

Cost: $13

Pair it with: Puttanesca sauce or even a spicy Thai dish