It's a nice idea - using natural skincare products chock-full of vegetables and other plants. Plants are good for you, right?

It's a nice idea - using natural skincare products chock-full of vegetables and other plants. Plants are good for you, right?

Chalk it up to watching too much "Mad Men," but I'm guessing a lot of items promote themselves as being "natural" but might have weird chemicals lurking inside. So assuming that not all natural skincare products are created equal, I put one line to the test.

The bottle of Yes to Carrots Daily Cream Facial Cleanser ($8, Walgreens) says it is 96 percent natural and paraben-free. Awesome.

I was excited to see whether the stuff would be orange and smell like carrots. Sadly, it was white and smelled like a floral Air Wick.

The goop felt thick and silky. After washing it off, my skin seemed softer, as if I'd just moisturized. Once again, awesome.

Then I looked at the ingredients - glyceryl stearate didn't sound natural. Indeed it's a pesticide used at vineyards, according to the internet. Less awesome. But the cleanser worked well, and the next day my face still felt soft.

Next up was Yes to Cucumbers Facial Towelettes ($6, Walgreens). The no-water-needed, makeup-removing product didn't smell like cucumber, but it was satisfying to see my makeup - even my waterproof mascara - end up on the pad.

Along with cucumber, the towelettes contain sodium benzoate, a preservative that's used as fuel in fireworks. Yet somehow they're biodegradable, so I'll take them with me next time I go camping.

The Yes to Tomatoes Deep Cleansing Pads ($8, Walgreens) were similar in success to the towelettes, but their salicylic acid promised to prevent breakouts and added a tingly sensation.

So the products are a success, as long as you accept that they're not really natural.