The new Drew Barrymore comedy "Going the Distance" has a long-distance problem of its own. It can't bridge the gap between smart indie comedy and dumbed-down raunchfest.

The new Drew Barrymore comedy "Going the Distance" has a long-distance problem of its own.

It can't bridge the gap between smart indie comedy and dumbed-down raunchfest. It tries for some of each and ends up not being very good at either.

Garrett (Justin Long) meets the sharp-witted Erin (Barrymore) in a bar. They hit it off and have the kind of night that usually only exists in a writer's mind. It starts with too clever conversation and ends with bong hits (?) and making out.

What they expected to just be a fling turns out to be too good to give up when Erin has to move across the country for an all-too-rare newspaper job. They give the long-distance thing a go and quickly learn of its challenges and shortcomings.

"Distance" director Nanette Burstein leaps to a feature after a pair of outstanding documentaries ("The Kid Stays in the Picture" and "American Teen"). Her heart is in the right place. The script is not.

The movie is riddled with F-bombs in an attempt to give it edge, and it has surprisingly little insight into long-distance relationships. They're tough? No kidding.

There are certainly a few laughs, but Barrymore and Long are all cute with no contrast. I hope they've got more chemistry in real life.

The only highlights come from supporting roles, particularly Christina Applegate as Erin's married sister and Charlie Day as Garrett's roommate (though he's light-years more funny on "Always Sunny").

It's a fun-enough date movie, but I'd recommend just breaking up and moving on.