Posters don't have to be something you leave behind at the end of college. True, it's probably time to throw out the oversized one of Bob Marley smoking ganja. But if done correctly, decorating with screen-prints is a cost-effective, grown-up way to cover bare walls with art.

Posters don't have to be something you leave behind at the end of college. True, it's probably time to throw out the oversized one of Bob Marley smoking ganja. But if done correctly, decorating with screen-prints is a cost-effective, grown-up way to cover bare walls with art.

Luckily, Columbus is home to poster artists who offer everything from rock show ads to electric-pink world maps.

"That's the product of a healthy art scene," said artist Clinton Reno of the city's poster offerings. Reno has designed rock posters for My Morning Jacket, Interpol and hundreds of other bands. His muted-color, limited-edition screen-prints are for sale at clintonreno.com for as little as $20.

Under the name These Are Things, graphic designers Jen Adrion and Omar Noory make vibrant maps that can fill a room with color - while helping those who aren't geography whizzes. The maps start at $45 and are for sale at thesearethings.com.

And Mike Martin's company, EngineHouse13, creates bold, occasionally eerie concert art. Martin thinks the best way to display his posters - available at enginehouse13.com - is by tacking or taping them up, but he understands that rock posters no longer merely advertise a show.

"In this collectible day and age, they're not disposable anymore," Martin said.

There are quite a few ways to hang a poster without resorting to Sticky Tack or tape.

Beyond traditional frames, which can be pricey for a poster that isn't a standard size, products such as ReFrame, available online, are glassless yet elegant.

But if you want to protect your art, it's worth investing in a frame with UV glass. Reno warns that even a little bit of sunlight can fade posters, particularly those made with water-based inks.