When seminal indie rockers Pavement disbanded in 1999, most of the members continued to make music. Thus, the reunion tour that comes to LC Pavilion Thursday didn't bring a radical lifestyle shift for them, other than playing larger venues for a new generation of salivating fanboys.

When seminal indie rockers Pavement disbanded in 1999, most of the members continued to make music. Thus, the reunion tour that comes to LC Pavilion Thursday didn't bring a radical lifestyle shift for them, other than playing larger venues for a new generation of salivating fanboys.

In the wake of the breakup, frontman Stephen Malkmus kept kicking out jams with The Jicks. Guitarist Scott Kannberg founded Preston School of Industry and later released an album under his Spiral Stairs alias. Steve West shifted from drumming to singing in Marble Valley. Bassist Mark Ibold eventually joined Sonic Youth.

Bob Nastanovich? He got into horse racing. Waaay into horse racing.

"Too much to talk about unless you're writing for the sports page," Nastanovich said during a phone interview from his Des Moines home.

Nastanovich works at tracks around the country, usually collecting stats for horse racing database Equibase. The job sent him to Beulah Park in Grove City for four months in 2008, during which time he proposed to his wife, Whitney. Their engagement was a highlight of an otherwise "rough" stay.

"They do have a nice bowling alley there in the middle of town," Nastanovich said.

When the mercurial Malkmus finally caved to demand for a Pavement reunion, Nastanovich put his equine pursuits on hold.

"There was no question that if this ever came up I was going to do it," Nastanovich said.

The quirky career path makes sense considering Nastanovich's unusual role in Pavement. He was hired in 1990 as a glorified roadie responsible for playing auxiliary percussion and keeping drummer Gary Young from plunging into inebriation.

"My job was to make sure Gary was able to drum," Nastanovich remembered. "And if he wasn't, if I failed at that part of my job, I had to make sure there was some kind of time being kept."

Nastanovich had to redefine his job when West replaced Young in 1994. He began playing keyboard parts, background sounds and auxiliary percussion - the ultimate indie-rock utility man.

Intense vocal parts that Malkmus found too strenuous to repeat night after night became Nastanovich's most memorable responsibility. The delegation yielded Nastanovich's spirited rendition of the "Conduit for Sale" chorus, frantically shouting "I'm tryin'!" on indefinite repeat.

That song was the climactic moment of Pavement's triumphant headlining set at Chicago's Pitchfork Music Festival.

Like the Pixies before them, Pavement enjoyed a massive fan base as their influence permeated the music landscape post-breakup. Pretty much every band under the "indie" umbrella owes some debt to Pavement's clumsy melodic jangle and absurdist lyrical jumble.

Speaking of clumsy, Pavement has always been a slightly haphazard live act. But Nastanovich said the tour has been "pretty consistent by Pavement standards."

"You don't get that many cracks at this," he said, "so you kind of want to make it good."