Fox's "Lone Star" has so many good things going for it that it'll either change the landscape of network television or get canceled in its first season.

Fox's "Lone Star" has so many good things going for it that it'll either change the landscape of network television or get canceled in its first season.

Network viewers rarely - with the exception of "Lost" - go all-in for an in-depth, serialized drama that's a weekly appointment. That's cable's territory.

"Lone Star" requires loyal viewership because its story about charismatic con man Robert Allen (James Wolk) leading a dual life in Texas - in Houston, he's the son-in-law of oil tycoon Clint Thatcher (Jon Voight), and in Midland, he's a swindler - is not only compelling but intricate.

Making his cons even more complicated are the women he loves in each town - Thatcher's daughter, Cat (Adrianne Palicki), and the beautifully naive Lindsay (Eloise Mumford) in Midland. Oh, and his nefarious grifter father (David Keith), who keeps reminding him these women don't love him, just his con.

As the lies begin to unravel, he knows there's only one way out - running. But he can't bring himself to leave his loves either of them.

The pilot, directed by Marc Webb ("(500) Days of Summer"), is quite possibly the best opening episode ever. Everything is magnificent, from the elegant camerawork to the subtle ways Webb conveys enduring love, regret and tension.

The problem? It's better suited for cable's FX or AMC. Thankfully, Fox promised executive producer Kyle Killen he could treat it like a cable show. I don't expect cancellation.