Pittsburgh-born playwright Mark Harvey Levine specializes in short plays. Columbus' MadLab Theatre has long made short plays one of its own specialties. So a whole evening of Levine's shorts at MadLab sounds like a match made in theatrical heaven.

Pittsburgh-born playwright Mark Harvey Levine specializes in short plays. Columbus' MadLab Theatre has long made short plays one of its own specialties. So a whole evening of Levine's shorts at MadLab sounds like a match made in theatrical heaven.

"Cabfare for the Common Man," a collection of seven playlets running from Sept. 30 through Oct.23, isn't Levine and MadLab's first date.

Two of these playlets have rotated through MadLab's annual "Theatre Roulette" productions - 2005's "Surprise" is about a psychic able to see only two minutes into the future, while a woman receives a birthday gift of a temporary boyfriend in 2008's "The Rental."

Rounding out "Cabfare" are five new productions. In "Scripted," a couple stumbles upon the script of the play they are living, the one that the audience is watching - sort of Luigi Pirandello meets "The Truman Show."

Two misfits find each other and some appetizers in "Passed Hordes," and we discover whether a kiss is just a kiss when a guy asks his female best friend to evaluate his osculatory talents in "The Kiss."

If love is a madness shared by two people, one of whom believes he is a superhero, what should the other do? "Superhero" suggests her role might be to concoct situations from which to be rescued.

And the title short turns a taxi ride into a crowded metaphor for life itself.

Acknowledging the playwright's pun on Aaron Copland's famous classical piece "Fanfare for the Common Man," we might look in Dante's direction and call "Cabfare" "The Levine Comedy."