Have it your way - that's Christine Guillot Ryan's take on her artwork. The local artist's mixed-media paintings span multiple canvasses that can be hung in different arrangements depending on personal taste.

Have it your way - that's Christine Guillot Ryan's take on her artwork.

The local artist's mixed-media paintings span multiple canvasses that can be hung in different arrangements depending on personal taste.

Many of Guillot Ryan's pieces at Sean Christopher Gallery - her first exhibition - will be modular, with images that cross over the boundaries of the canvas. Underneath each of the works on display, she'll post a picture of other possible configurations.

The idea of artwork not being confined to one square was inspired by a gift of four small canvasses given to Guillot Ryan by her family.

"Because they were a gift, I was really open to experimentation," she said.

Guillot Ryan, who hopes to become a professional artist after spending more than 15 years as a graphic designer, weaves strips of found images - everything from Google Maps satellite images to photos from Alive - into her paintings.

"I use images sort of as paint. It's always based on an idea that I want to communicate," she explained.

She isn't sure during the creation process how many of the specific materials will end up being noticeable in a piece.

"Because I work on it in layers, I don't always know the things underneath that might be visible. It leaves it open to chance," she said. "That's how life is. You go along with a certain plan, and then something happens, but not necessarily what you think."

Rivet Gallery

Fourteen artists took on the theme of "finding a cure" for Rivet Gallery's October exhibition.

"Being a breast cancer survivor, I felt a passionate connection with this cause and wanted to try and do what I could to bring more awareness to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation," said gallery owner Laura Kuenzli, who also pointed out that a lot of cancer patients use art therapy as a way to escape from their troubles.

One-quarter of the exhibition's sales will be donated to the research foundation.

Studios on High

October's exhibition at Studios on High pairs two different takes on landscape painting. Tom Harbrecht's oil paintings are realistic-looking scenic views, while Ruth Ann Mitchell's abstract interpretations of landscapes use varied textures and vibrant colors to draw the eye.