At its down and dirty dawn, rock 'n' roll was about shaking off the shackles of polite society and behaving like wild animals. Before Alan Freed popularized the phrase, it was an idiom for cutting loose on both axes. Parents, hide your daughters!

At its down and dirty dawn, rock 'n' roll was about shaking off the shackles of polite society and behaving like wild animals. Before Alan Freed popularized the phrase, it was an idiom for cutting loose on both axes. Parents, hide your daughters!

Rock has evolved in so many directions that the term barely means anything anymore. The path from Chuck Berry to Phil Collins is long and twisted.

That ain't necessarily a bad thing. Rock's taming and sophistication has yielded a vast spectrum of incredible music. But sometimes you want to indulge in unfettered excess.

Lou Poster and Lara Yazvac have been making that kind of music for more than a decade - he the driving force behind sludgy garage punk powerhouse Grafton, she the throat-searing voice behind soulful retro rockers The Tough and Lovely. They share a raw, rambunctious and downright nasty pedigree.

The thought of Poster and Yazvac playing together sends shivers down my spine. And now just such a band exists.

It's hard to conceive of a better name for this project than The Ferals. Unrepentantly primitive, it's music for foraging through trash bins, sleeping under stars and roaming in packs.

I encountered them last Wednesday at Cafe Bourbon Street. Yazvac and Poster slung guitars, backed by Victoria Mahnke on the city's most Spartan drum kit: one tom, one snare. Yazvac handled vocal duties.

They were dolled up in rumpled vests and bowties. It looked as if the hired help from a banquet hall had staged a violent revolt, passed out in a gutter and woke up to form a rock band.

The Ferals banged through about 20 minutes of unhinged rock 'n' roll. It was supposed to sound frayed around the edges, but even so these songs felt a bit unfinished, which isn't surprising considering they formed last month and started writing their set two days before their first show.

If they follow through with this project, I'm certain it'll become as focused as it is ferocious.

One thing I demand, though, is a microphone in Poster's face. What's the point of him being in a band with Yazvac if they're not going to belt out hair-raising duets?